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Posts tagged ‘STRI’

Sal Anzaldo featured in the STRI Newsletter

This month’s STRI Newsletter has a short feature article called “Why Weevils?” (in English and in Spanish) on Sal Anzaldo’s research on conoderine weevils in Panama. The link to the PDF with the article (page 6) is here.

SalAnzaldo-STRI-Newsletter

Sal Anzaldo – Why Weevils?

Collecting adventures in Panama

My second semester as a graduate student has been spent conducting research with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama. Since February, I have been dividing my time between working in STRI’s Insect Collection in Panama City and traveling around Panama collecting insects. In the Collection I’ve been making an interactive identification key to the 29 currently described Panamanian genera of weevils in the subfamily Conoderinae, available shortly in SCAN. This has been possible thanks to the collecting of Henry Stockwell in the 1970s and 1980s, whose large collection of conoderines contains numerous undescribed species.

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Recent SoLS awards to lab members

Some good news came to our lab recently in the form of SoLS-sponsored research awards and fellowships.

  • Undergraduate student  Usmaan Basharat received a SOLUR Apprentice grant for the project “Molecular phylogenetics and biogeography of Cuban weevils (Curculionidae)”.
  • Graduate student Sal Anzaldo was awarded a STRI Graduate Fellowship to spend the 2014 Spring Semester in Panama, take a course in tropical field biology, and conduct research on conoderine weevils.
  • Postdoctoral researcher Guanyang Zhang received the SoLS-RTI Postdoctoral Research Award, jointly with Patrick Browne of the Cadillo Lab, for the project “Elucidating weevil-endosymbiont associations and diversity across different ecological and evolutionary scales”‘.

Congratulations to all!

New course announcement – Tropical Biology Panama – June 2014

Dale DeNardo and Nico Franz are offering a new, advanced undergraduate course “Tropical Biology” in the summer of 2014. The course is scheduled to take place from June 07-27, 2014, on location in Gamboa, Panama (Canal Zone, Soberanía National Park). It is part of ASU’s Partnership program with the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. Interested students can contact Dr. Franz, and should also follow updates on ASU’s Study Abroad Office website. Below are links to two pertinent PDFs and a general text introducing the course.

Update – November 26, 2013: We now have an official SAO Web Brochure for the course at https://studyabroad.asu.edu/?go=TropicalBiology. Students can apply using this link.

Update – December 04, 2013: The course is now officially SAO approved, with a course program fee set at $4370. The Flyer has been updated. On-line applications now possible via the SAO link above.

Update – December 06, 2013: ASU’s Study Abroad Office has a comprehensive summary page regarding student financing options – Financial Aid, Scholarships and Grants, Community-Based Funding, etc. – for participating in the Tropical Biology course. Students are strongly encouraged to explore this resource and/or contact SAO directly to learn about specific financing options. More information on this soon.


“This new faculty-led Tropical Biology course takes what students have learned in the classroom setting and allows them to expand their knowledge by becoming fully immersed in a field environment. While the field site is a tropical rainforest, the educational value goes beyond tropical biology as students are exposed to topics that broadly integrate ecology, biodiversity, evolution, behavior, and physiology, including but not limited to species diversity, adaptation, biogeography, conservation, and human-wildlife interactions. Even the most complex laboratory environment and design cannot come close to matching the complexity of the tropical forest and the educational stimulation it provides. Students who attend this course will receive a lifetime experience and therefore concepts and skill sets covered will be embedded in their memory.”


Update – June 28, 2014: The trip to Panama has ended successfully. See Tropical Field Biology – Panama 2014 in Review.