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Posts tagged ‘collection’

Hasbrouck Insect Collection poster presentations at 21st SoLS Undergraduate Symposium

ASUHIC and Franz Lab students contributed two research posters to this year’s 21st Annual Undergraduate Research Poster Symposium of ASU’s School of Life Sciences, held on the afternoon of April 04, 2014. Here are the authors, titles, and links to PDFs. Well done, all!

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ASUHIC Night of the Open Door – 2014

On the evening of March 1st, 2014, the Franz Lab and Hasbrouck Insect Collection team participated in ASU’s annual Night of the Open Door Event. We created close to 1500 sq. ft. of space with diverse themes, stations, apps, and activities for insect and invertebrate enthusiasts of all ages. Live bedbugs,  hissing cockroaches, insect origami, Arium3D’s “Beyond a Bug in a Box”, land and marine shells, bees, true bugs, cameras and microscopes, a giant Jerusalem cricket, and much more.

As in the previous year, the event attracted well over 1,000 visitors and was an amazing success (in spite of rare and strong Arizona spring rains). Special thanks to Andrea, Annette, Catherine, Dale, Danica,  Guanyang, Michael (L.), Michael (S.), Sarah, Zhen, and of course Melody and Sangmi for making it all happen. See more photos of the event here.

This was likely the last outing of this kind in the Life Sciences W Wing. Next year we hope to celebrate the Night of the Open Door activities at our newly renovated location at Alameda Drive.

2013 entomology collections – some highlights posted

Here are – all posted with kind permission – some photos of the student collections submitted as part of this year’s General Entomology course. The collections shown were among the most diverse, and/or well presented final submissions (however the line-up is far from complete). Students had to accumulate 100 insect specimens, curate them properly, and identify each specimen to the level of family.  Congratulations!

TDWG 2013: SCAN – Leveraging Filtered Push Technology to Enhance Remote Taxonomic Identifications

Presentation slides are now posted for the TDWG 2013 SCAN talk.

Franz Et Al. SCAN – Southwest Collections of Arthropods Network: Leveraging Filtered Push Technology to Enhance Remote Taxonomic Identifications from taxonbytes

Date: 2013-10-29 02:45 PM – 02:50 PM

Abstract

SCAN – the Southwest Collections of Arthropods Network (http://symbiota1.acis.ufl.edu/scan/portal/) – is the first regional arthropod biodiversity data network that utilizes the Symbiota software platform (http://symbiota.org/tiki/tiki-index.php). Since its origin in 2012 SCAN has unified and newly created specimen-level occurrence records on-line pertaining to nearly 15 south-western United States arthropod collections; including more than 515,000 records that represent some 18,000 species. However, due to the disproportionately mismatched diversity versus taxonomic expertise for the region and focal taxa, at least one third of the specimens are not identified (authoritatively or otherwise) to the level of species, with concomitant limitations for derivative taxonomic or evolutionary/ecological research. The member collections are typically separated from each other geographically by distances that prohibit frequent interactions with regional or global experts, except in virtual realm. SCAN has therefore implemented a Filtered Push (FP) based service (http://wiki.filteredpush.org/wiki/) whose primary purpose is to connect high-quality imaged of yet insufficiently identified specimens with suitable experts who can provide identifications remotely. This is achieved through the FP-server system which both records these contributions externally and pushes them back into the source Symbiota platform for review, acceptance, or rejection by the respective collection/node leaders. SCAN is therefore primed to utilize FP at a large scale and with a well circumscribed focal purpose that is relevant to the specific needs of this collections network. We illustrate the SCN/FP workflow, underlying concepts and technology, and current state of implementation and usage. FP allows experts to gradually accumulate credit and “reputations” for their identification contributions, and thus represents a promising means to improve data quality through transparent and distributed expert involvement and attribution.

TDWG 2013: Crowd sourcing and community management capabilities with Symbiota

Presentation sequence in development for the following TDWG 2013 presentation: Franz, N., C. Gries, T. Nash III & E. Gilbert. 2013. Crowd Sourcing and Community Management Capabilities Available within Symbiota Data Portals.

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Hasbrouck Insect Collection reaches 40,000 on-line records

Last week the ASUHIC’s on-line holdings reached the number of 40,000 specimen records – 100% georeferenced – and representing > 80 families, 860 genera, and 2600 species. Prioritized families include Crabronidae, Curculionidae, Formicidae, Mutillidae, and Scarabaeidae all with > 4000 records. We also have ~ 730 high-resolution images on-line. Thanks to our undergraduate students – current and past – for your quality work.

ASU Herbarium videos on SEINet and OCR based digitization

Via ASU’s Herbarium curator Les Landrum:

  1. A vimeo website maintained by the Herbarium with several instructional videos on how to process “skeletal” herbarium sheet records in SEINet using optical character recognition (OCR) and SALIX (Semi-Automatic Label Information eXtraction System) technology.
  2. A related paper: Barber, A., D. Lafferty & L.R. Landrum. 2013. The SALIX Method: A semi-automated workflow for herbarium specimen digitization. Taxon 62: 581-590. Available (subscription) here.

Early stages of Alameda construction – future ASU natural history collections research and outreach space

Here are some early stage photos, taken on September 20, 2013, of the future space at 734 W Alameda Drive (Tempe) that will house the School of Life Sciences’ Natural History Collections and associated research, informatics, teaching, and outreach activities. Constructions started approximately two weeks ago.

Update, November 05, 2013: The SoLS “Phase II” (south) section of the Alameda Building (ca. 24,000 sq. ft.) will be named: Alameda Biocollections and Biodiversity Informatics Complex; abbreviated ABBIC.