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Hasbrouck Insect Collection poster presentations at 21st SoLS Undergraduate Symposium

ASUHIC and Franz Lab students contributed two research posters to this year’s 21st Annual Undergraduate Research Poster Symposium of ASU’s School of Life Sciences, held on the afternoon of April 04, 2014. Here are the authors, titles, and links to PDFs. Well done, all!

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Sangmi Lee joins Wedge Entomological Research Foundation Board of Directors

Our own Sangmi Lee was honored recently by being elected to join the Board of Directors of the Wedge Entomological Research Foundation.

Via the WERF website: “The Wedge Entomological Research Foundation (WERF) is a non- profit organization dedicated to producing taxonomic monographs on the moth fauna of the Nearctic Region. The Foundation’s principle focus is to publish biosystematic treatments on the estimated sixteen thousand plus species of moths found in North America in a series of monographs – “The Moths of North America” (MONA).

Excerpts from the Entomological Society of America news post: “Sangmi becoming one of the foremost experts in this difficult group. Sangmi developed the most comprehensive website on Gelechiidae which includes a global framework for phylogenetics and classification of Gelechioidea. She contributed educational videos on collecting and dissecting microlepidoptera that are available on YouTube. Sangmi is the Collection Manager of the Hasbrouck Insect Collection at Arizona State University, since 2012, and she serves as a referee to the Moth Photographs Group (MPG) site for identifications of gelechiids.”

Read the entire post here. Congrats, Sangmi!!

Weekly reading: Using dynamic homology without parsimony

Dynamic homologypart 1, part2, and now, for behavioral data (not exclusively, one presumes):

Japyassú, H.F. & F.d.A. Machado. 2010. Coding behavioural data for cladistic analysis: using dynamic homology without parsimony. Cladistics 26: 625-642. Available here.

More on this soon, well, hopefully. At least we are caught up now with our weekly reading posts.

Weekly reading: A dynamic homology approach for morphological data

Following up on last week’s wide-ranging explorations of dynamic homology sensu Wheeler, this week’s original, inspiring, and overall excellent paper by Martín Ramírez applies the issue to the challenge of properly (read: parsimoniously) assigning one or two of three potentially available sclerite ‘identities’ to their homologous positions in the complex male spider pedipalps and ranging over variously simultaneous inferred clades. Complex, engaging, and well conceived material for thought and possible application.

Ramírez, M.J. 2007. Homology as a parsimony problem: a dynamic homology approach for morphological data. Cladistics 23: 588-612. Available here.

P.s.: Posted retrospectively for April 04, 2014.

Weekly reading: Dynamic homology and the likelihood criterion

Dynamic homology is an intriguing concept, though getting from the general notion of optimizing character correspondence (inapplicables, indels) and phylogeny simultaneously to a fully realized implementation is not trivial. In this week’s reading we examine a paper by Ward Wheeler who has promoted this approach with a strong emphasis on parsimony optimization.

Wheeler, W.C.  2006. Dynamic homology and the likelihood criterion. Cladistics 22: 157-170. Available here.

P.s.: Posted retrospectively for March 28, 2014.